Happy or Hungry Eats the World: Rhapsody (Hungary)

I am on a mission to eat an authentic dish from every country in the world, right here in Toronto. You can find all past recaps here.

Today I am hungry for Hungary!

hungary

That will be my only time using that pun, I promise.

Last week while Lisa was still visiting from Calgary, we had a dinner date at Rhapsody Continental Cuisine in Richmond Hill with Evan and her parents, Diane and Phil.

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It was romantic.

Richmond Hill is just north of Toronto but it is considered part of the GTA (Greater Toronto Area) and therefore qualifies for eating the world (in Toronto). The family-operated restaurant has been popular with Lisa’s family since she and her sister Heather were kids, so I had been hearing from them that it is good and authentic Hungarian, but I have also had a few blog readers mention it to me as well. There is another Hungarian restaurant downtown Toronto, Country Style, and while I hear it’s good, I keep hearing that Rhapsody is the best. I was excited to try it!

Hungarian food is traditionally based on meats, seasonable vegetables and fruits, fresh bread, and cheese. Sign me up. Like many countries in that area of Europe, they are big on stews, stuffed peppers, cabbage rolls, and schnitzel (although not so much perogies). And Goulash (gulyás), a soup or stew with meat and vegetables, seasoned with paprika. Goulash originated in medieval Hungary and it also popular in Central and Southern Europe and Scandinavia. It is one of the national dishes of Hungary and a symbol of the country (by way, I was looking up National dishes of countries they all look legit except for Canada’s, which is Kraft dinner, poutine, Nanaimo bars and butter tarts. I said that in my Eats the World: Canada as a joke!).

I definitely needed to try the goulash soup. It was served in a traditional bogrács!

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I loved it. So good.

We also ordered calamari, which I am pretty sure isn’t a traditional Hungarian dish but you can never go wrong with calamari.

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And mushroom caps stuffed with baby shrimp & spinach, served in a parmesan cream sauce.

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Which is popular in Hungary, as they have 20-30 varieties of wild mushrooms. Those were amazing.

Evan and I both thought that we couldn’t eat Hungary without getting schnitzel, so we got the house platter for two which included ALL THE SCHNITZEL. Wiener schnitzel (actually the national dish of Austria but popular in Hungary as well), Parisian schnitzel (a wiener schnitzel variation from the French cuisine) and naturel schnitzel (I don’t know what naturel was referring to but it was good). Also Debreszeni sausage, cabbage roll, and pickled red cabbage. And rice.

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This was underneath all the schnitzel:

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Everything was SO. GOOD. Everything. That cabbage really surprised me, I wanted more of it!

The rest of the table went with the wiener schnitzel as well.

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They also had rice and red cabbage buried under there, I should mention.

I really like schnitzel. Do I wish it was served with some kind of tangy red tomato sauce? Yes. But I still really like it. It’s fried meat, what’s not to like?

For dessert I ordered the Palacsinta, Hungarian crepes filled with apricot jelly (also popular in Eastern Europe in general).

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I was so full by that point that I could not do them justice, but they were quite good.

It was a great dinner and everything we ordered was so good! And so was the service. Our sever Tibor (I am not sure if I’m spelling that right) was just a bright a ray of sunshine.

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And as you can tell from the pic, the atmosphere was very comfortable and homey. I liked it a lot and highly recommend Rhapsody if you are in the Richmond Hill area!

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5 responses to “Happy or Hungry Eats the World: Rhapsody (Hungary)

  1. Is schnitzel German too? I wonder if they make it differently in Germany and Hungary?

    • Yeah, it is very popular there and I think it’s basically the same. Also in Australia, Brazil, Bulgaria, China, Colombia, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Egypt, Finland, Iran, Israel, Japan,etc etc. apparently it’s popular everywhere, but it may be called something different (Japan for example is tonkatsu or pork cutlet). I am learning so much!

      Also, according to Wikipedia guess what your national dish is? Hamburgers, hotdogs, fried chicken and buffalo wings.

  2. YEAH!!!! Tibor! So much fun. I will stare at these food pics when i have a craving for that beautiful restaurant.

  3. Your national dish is freedom tho…